UMBC MEYERHOFF APPLICATION PDF

Skip to Main Content. The UMBC he Meyerhoff Scholars Program offers a different emphasis that focuses on highly able students who aspire to become leading research scientists and engineers. The program is open to people of all backgrounds committed to increasing the representation of minorities in science and engineering. In a proven formula for success, the program adheres to 13 key components.

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NCBI Bookshelf. Freeman Hrabowski. Hrabowski is one of only a very small number of African American presidents of predominantly white universities in our country. When he came to our campus in , we had no coordinated minority training efforts on campus. He has really transformed UMBC. He is an example of how one person with a vision and a lot of energy can have a large catalytic effect and can change the way departments view education and treat their students.

In the latter part, I will tell you about our more recent efforts to develop a biomedical graduate training program that is modeled after the undergraduate program. Today at UMBC, there are nine different undergraduate programs and three graduate programs run by faculty in different departments across campus, based on the highly successful Meyerhoff model.

You can see that the Meyerhoff program is not being run by just one person, even though one person started this. Hrabowski has affected a lot of people in different departments across our campus. The Undergraduate Scholars Program is named after the Meyerhoff family. That is how Dr. Hrabowski started this program in Today the program is entering its 14th year. After the first year, it was modified to include African American females.

Today, our program is open to all high-achieving students. Although the Meyerhoff undergraduate program was opened to all students in , we still have 71 percent participation by African Americans, 14 percent by Asian students, and only 12 percent by Caucasians. UMBC has worked hard to make certain that the original focus would be maintained, in part by including activities that will be of interest mainly to students that care about underrepresentation in SEM fields.

There is a misconception when it comes to the issue of students entering the SEM pipeline. People say that there are very small numbers of undergraduate students who are interested in SEM when they enter in their freshman year.

At UMBC, that is not what we see. For the fall of incoming class we have over 1, nominations for our Meyerhoff program.

Ninety percent of these applicants are from Maryland. Of the 1, nominations, nearly students have completed applications for only 50 available positions. Again, the majority of those applications are from Maryland. As can be seen by the numbers at UMBC, there is a large population of high school seniors who seek out college with an interest in SEM.

These are talented, high-achieving minority students who are doing well in high school and who qualify for our program. A study conducted by the University of California, Berkeley, has shown that a large majority of students start college interested in SEM degrees. We believe that among those students there is a large pool of underrepresented minority students.

The study found that many of the students lost interest or decided that the SEM areas were too hard very early on in their freshman year. Thus, the data clearly reveal that, although very large numbers of highly talented and motivated minority students with interests in SEM fields now exist in the United States, few are retained in the sciences. The program that Dr. Hrabowski set up was designed to ensure that we recruit students that are likely to succeed and then make sure that we retain them in SEM.

Once they get past their freshman year, large numbers of these talented underrepresented minority students want to begin working in research labs.

At UMBC we have found that faculty welcome these students into their labs. The Meyerhoff Scholars Program contains several major components: the Summer Bridge program, mentoring, summer research experience, monetary support including room and board, tuition and fees, and a book allowance , cultural arts activities, academic advising, travel to present research at national scientific conferences, assistance with graduate and professional school placement, and staff support.

We have two different mentoring programs: research and professional mentors. Both on- and off-campus research experiences are required for all students.

We also provide monetary support. We do not receive any tuition breaks for these students. That is one reason most of them are Maryland residents. We actively recruit high school students who look promising in science. People criticize UMBC on this point because they believe that these students will make it anyway. What I will show you is, yes, we are taking the cream of the crop, but what we are doing differently is, keeping them in science. So, these students represent the cream of the crop.

We have two selection weekends in which applicants come to campus with their families and participate in numerous activities, including interviews with students, faculty, and administrators in the program and the university. After the selection weekends are over, the interviews and placement tests are tabulated. Then we decide who will be offered a scholarship. The students have to have a B average in their preparatory classes.

The SAT scores have to be at least with a math score. Students also have to have a strong interest in pursuing doctoral professional degrees. We are emphasizing the Ph. Hrabowski will tell you that we think we have let our students down if they go to medical school, because we are trying to encourage them to think about creative research as a career.

In , the national average of SAT scores for all students was , for African American high school students it was , and for the Meyerhoff students it was That is a difference of over points.

As I stated earlier, we are taking the best and the brightest. To determine if what we are doing works, we have a strong evaluation component to the program. He has determined that the Summer Bridge is perhaps the most critical piece of the program. The students enter the program and have to take 21 hours of classroom contact time during their six-week program. Let me reiterate, they are in class 21 hours a week.

Then students must participate in workshops on business etiquette, study skills, and time management, and they visit numerous science and technology workplaces in the Baltimore and Washington, D. Beyond that, they have to study. They receive seven credits for their participation in the Summer Bridge.

These kids learn quickly how to study in groups, how to study independently, and how to support each other when they are studying and preparing for classes. Building that sense of camaraderie is absolutely essential. Many of the students have had calculus before, but nevertheless, they have to retake it at the college level. This teaches them what it is going to take to succeed, not at their high school level, but to succeed at high levels in college. Hrabowski tells these kids that he does not expect them to make an A.

He says that he expects them to make a high A. Also, he expects them to be running the tutorial center and helping other students. We have seen that this is indeed what happens.

This program has had a huge effect on the white faculty at our campus. That is something that I think is often overlooked when we think about minority training. In general, I think it is the white faculty that have to be educated as much as the minority students.

None of us—now I am speaking for many of my white colleagues—want to think of ourselves as having prejudices. Nevertheless, we have been raised in white neighborhoods and generally live in white neighborhoods, so we do not understand many of the issues that the underrepresented minority students are facing. For example, some of the senior faculty in my department said that, prior to Dr. Hrabowski, they might occasionally see one or two underrepresented minority students in their upper-level undergraduate classes.

When they were in the classes, they never spoke up, they often sat in the back of the class, and they generally—although not always— did not perform as well as most of the white students. Now we see large numbers of underrepresented minority students sitting in the front of the class, asking questions, and pushing the teachers.

That has a huge affect on the perceptions of the white faculty. Educating the faculty needs to be a big part of what goes on, especially at majority research institutions. As a part of the Meyerhoff Program, there is counseling and advising for students. In their freshman year, they are monitored on a weekly basis. If they do poorly on a test, the academic advisor is aware and addresses the situation. The students are paired with a tutor or study group, depending on their need.

There are tutors available for students that need help; many times these are upper-level Meyerhoff students. The staff makes sure that the students do not get into academic trouble in their freshman year. We have a great professional mentoring program that Dr. Hrabowski started, in which students are paired with underrepresented minority mentors in the Baltimore and Washington, D. These might be business leaders or faculty.

Also, we have a research mentoring program for students, with faculty from all over the country. People come from around the country to participate in what we are doing at UMBC because they want to help these students.

We have an interesting, high level of family involvement. The Parents Association contributes significant money, but even more than that, they contribute their time.

Whenever there are big events, the parents will come and help do whatever it takes to make sure the event is successful. They are very active in the program, even after their child graduates.

For example, three generations—grandparents, parents, and child—of one family have actively participated in the program. All students are required to participate in a summer research internship off campus for at least one summer during their career.

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How to Apply

NCBI Bookshelf. Freeman Hrabowski. Hrabowski is one of only a very small number of African American presidents of predominantly white universities in our country. When he came to our campus in , we had no coordinated minority training efforts on campus. He has really transformed UMBC. He is an example of how one person with a vision and a lot of energy can have a large catalytic effect and can change the way departments view education and treat their students.

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Step-By-Step Application Process

Meyerhoff Scholars are selected for their interests in the sciences, engineering, mathematics, or computer science and their plans to pursue a Ph. The selection committee considers academic performance, standardized test scores, recommendation letters, and proven commitment to community service. To be considered, applicants must be nominated to the program; most frequently by high school administrators, guidance counselors, or teachers. Deserving students may also be nominated by other adults who are influential in their educational and personal lives, including pastors and mentors. Nominators and applicants with questions, should contact Meyerhoff staff for additional information. What I found most exciting about being a Meyerhoff Scholar was just being immersed in an environment where everyone has a drive and is focused on achieving a goal.

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Benefits and Eligibility

Meyerhoff Scholars are selected for their interests in the sciences, engineering, mathematics, or computer science and their plans to pursue a Ph. The selection committee considers academic performance, standardized test scores, recommendation letters, and proven commitment to community service. Historically, application to the Meyerhoff Program was initiated through nomination. Nominations are most frequently submitted by high school administrators, guidance counselors, or teachers. Deserving students may also be nominated by other adults who are influential in their educational and personal lives, including community leaders, mentors, and family.

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Nomination Process

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