JOACHIM MEYER LONGSWORD PDF

Joachim Meyer ca. He was the last major figure in the tradition of the German grand master Johannes Liechtenauer , and in the last years of his life he devised at least three distinct and quite extensive fencing manuals. Meyer's writings incorporate both the traditional Germanic technical syllabus and contemporary systems that he encountered in his travels, including the Italian school of side sword fencing. Meyer was born in Basel, [4] where he presumably apprenticed as a cutler. He writes in his books that he traveled widely in his youth, most likely a reference to the traditional Walz that journeyman craftsmen were required to take before being eligible for mastery and membership in a guild. Journeymen were often sent to stand watch and participate in town and city militias a responsibility that would have been amplified for the warlike cutlers' guild , and Meyer learned a great deal about foreign fencing systems during his travels.

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While many of the texts also describe other weapons, the longsword provides a common thread throughout. Meyer also uses many of the lessons from the longsword as a basis for his other weapon treatises. From its earliest days the longsword was a battlefield weapon and remained in use as such through the 14th and 15th centuries, eventually fading into disuse as a common battlefield weapon at the close of the 16th century.

During this period, however, it also became the weapon of choice for judicial duels, as well as one of the central weapons in competitive schulefechten. This last application became the central focus of the longsword during the 16th century with the rise in popularity of fencing as a sport amongst the citizens of German towns and cities. Jump to: navigation , search. This section describes the late period longsword of Joachim Meyer and his contemporaries.

Personal tools Log in. Namespaces Page Discussion. Views Read View source View history. Navigation Main page Recent changes Random page. This page was last modified on 12 June , at This page has been accessed 70, times. Privacy policy About Scholar Victoria Disclaimers. Contents 1 Guards 1.

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Joachim Meyer

While many of the texts also describe other weapons, the longsword provides a common thread throughout. Meyer also uses many of the lessons from the longsword as a basis for his other weapon treatises. From its earliest days the longsword was a battlefield weapon and remained in use as such through the 14th and 15th centuries, eventually fading into disuse as a common battlefield weapon at the close of the 16th century. During this period, however, it also became the weapon of choice for judicial duels, as well as one of the central weapons in competitive schulefechten. This last application became the central focus of the longsword during the 16th century with the rise in popularity of fencing as a sport amongst the citizens of German towns and cities. Jump to: navigation , search.

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Joachim Meyer’s Longsword: Beware the Prellhauw!!

Joachim Meyer ca. It is seen as one of the most complete systems within medieval German martial arts. Meyer's book was reprinted in , and may have been an influential source for other 16th- and 17th-century German fencing books, including a book by Jacob Sutor. His book mostly consists of descriptive text, with only a few dozen woodcuts , each of which depicts several players enacting various techniques described in the text itself. The book consists of five chapters, covering the long sword , dussack a training weapon not unlike the messer , rapier , dagger , and pole weapons. Meyer's system generally flows from, and uses the terminology of, the German school of swordsmanship as set down by Johannes Lichtenauer , though Meyer's civilian system also appears to draw from contemporary Italian swordplay, including Achille Marozzo. These woodcuts typically depict the postures, cutting schemes signs or 'segno' in Italian as well as several players enacting various techniques described in the text itself.

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