GAMBESON PATTERN PDF

Includes 3 gambesons, two with optional pockets for plates inside the skirt; 4 surcoats including a cyclas ; 3 hose; 1 codpiece, 1 cuisse thigh protection , a renal belt with pockets for plates to protect the kidneys, and a swordbelt, in sizes S-XL. These garments go well with capes from Period Pattern no. These garments are functional fighting garb for use in the Society for Creative Anachronism and other re-enactment or recreation groups. The surcoats, hose and swordbelt can also be used as is or in an adapted form for civilian wear in these groups. Chain mail and plate armor were very expensive, and economically unfeasible for the average soldier of the Middle Ages. Most had to make do with padded garments called gambesons to keep them save from swords, daggers, arrows, and other dangers they encountered.

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Includes 3 gambesons, two with optional pockets for plates inside the skirt; 4 surcoats including a cyclas ; 3 hose; 1 codpiece, 1 cuisse thigh protection , a renal belt with pockets for plates to protect the kidneys, and a swordbelt, in sizes S-XL. These garments go well with capes from Period Pattern no. These garments are functional fighting garb for use in the Society for Creative Anachronism and other re-enactment or recreation groups.

The surcoats, hose and swordbelt can also be used as is or in an adapted form for civilian wear in these groups. Chain mail and plate armor were very expensive, and economically unfeasible for the average soldier of the Middle Ages. Most had to make do with padded garments called gambesons to keep them save from swords, daggers, arrows, and other dangers they encountered.

But even those who could afford armor had to wear something underneath metal armor, for comfort; this was usually padded. Surcoats from the French "sur le cote", i. With the return of crusaders from the Holy Land surcoats became wildly popular. The armholes deepened to the waist, then to the hip. Hose were almost universally worn, whether very loose, thinner and more fitted, or skin-tight; hose worn while fighting could be padded in places.

Renal belts were designed to be worn with armor for additional protection. Cuisses were padded thigh pieces, often with plates and metal knee caps attached; metal plates might be worn over the cuisses.

One had to have a sword belt to hold his sword; this version includes the authentically accurate way to secure it. Materials used for armor was generally sturdy and plain, linen, wool, and leather mostly, although very rarely silk was used, and it could be colorful.

It might be decorated with applique or paint, especially if it was a surcoat. But it usually be a waste of time, effort and money to decorate garments to be worn under mail or plate — not only would it not be seen, but embroidery, for example, would be rubbed, ripped, and made filthy in far too short a time. The extensive articles, many annotated drawings, and sewing-for-dummies tips like how to make bias are all exactly what I need.

I have recently put up a Web site for my 14th C. SCA stuff, and I make sure to plug your patterns wherever I used them. I used your pattern for the gambeson and gamboised cuisses, the surcaot, and some fighting tights not shown. For occasional 13th C use, I also made a sword-knot belt I need to post a picture. The patterns, designed by professional costumers, are rigorously researched to ensure historical authenticity, and include illustrated historical notes about the styles.

See the pages for each pattern to see pictures of clothing people have made from that Period Pattern. Mediaeval Miscellanea has been making Period Pavilions for over 35 years. We design, make, and sell traditional pavilions, colorful and decorated, as well as a line of faux buildings: cottages, castles, chapels, and more, all made of canvas and steel. Visit out photo Album for more photos You will find the pattern views on the cover in the album section.

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How to Make an 11 Cent. Padded Gambeson

As promised, today I will show you, how I have made my own Gambeson, or as it is otherwise known- padded armour. It was a type of light armour, worn underneath chainmail, or as main armour by poorer warriors. It consisted of many layers of linen sawn together, to cretate protection capable of absorbing shock of the blow and stop cuts and thrusts. It is in some ways similar to modern day Kevlar armour. Historically, early medieval gambesons would have been made of many layers of linen, usually between 17 and For the purposes of reenactment however, it is just as good and far more practical to use linen as outer fabric, with woolen or similar padding inside.

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I made this gambeson Figure 1 in I designed it to go under armour, and with a seperate padded gorget I also wear it for combat archery [ 1 ]. I wanted to avoid weak spots and bulky seams under the armpits, so I came up with pointed side panels that fit into the arm seam to cover that area. Figure 1 - Gambeson. Front view, partially exploded.

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Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. Historically in Europe it would have been made from wool or if your were fabulously wealthy linen, cotton or even silk. This may apply in Asia, I do not know.

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