BRICKWARS RULES PDF

The Farce is a mass satire created by all laughing things. Its jokes surround and penetrate the bricks, and its punchlines bind them together. With a Lite side, a Snark side, and a regrettably stupid Dim side, Farce-attuned minifigs attest that "everything is funny The Farce ensures that characters and factions exist only as their own worst straw-man plastic caricatures, and Farce-influenced events are rarely accompanied by any more logical justification than "wouldn't it be funny if," often going to absurd lengths to avoid one.

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Chapter 1: Gameplay. Unsophisticated players might think that the Letter of the Rules is more important than the Spirit, but the Letter is a lot less likely to sneak up behind you with an axe if you abuse it.

Almighty Benny and Major Natalya settle their BrikWars differences over a high-stakes game of Nano-BrikWars, proving themselves to be deadly metagamers. Bricks Bricks are the fundamental physical material making up the worlds of BrikWars. An individual brick is called a component - the smallest physical piece of an object that can't be disassembled any further, like a brick in a wall, the head of a minifig, or the entire body of a horse.

Most objects in BrikWars are built from plastic construction bricks, but non-construction toys and other components are included as well; minifigs can't tell the difference. It's good to have a supply of spare bricks close at hand.

Players can whip up a costume change for their hero, craters and random debris from explosions, support stands to hold airborne minifigs aloft between turns, and any other objects that might appear as the result of events spinning completely out of control. Extra blood and fire elements become increasingly useful as a battle drags on. Minifigs Minifigs and their violent passions are the heart and soul of a BrikWars battle. The minifig is the basic example of a unit - an active combatant within the game with the ability to engage in independent Movement and Action.

Dice Dice are spirits of chaos that power all meaningful events in BrikWars, bound in plastic and geometrically determined to thwart their Humans' plans. A minifig's ability to take Action and do Damage is determined by the Action die that animates him and the Damage dice he controls. The more dice, the better. Players can pass communal dice back and forth, but play goes much more smoothly if each player has their own set of dice to roll, preferably in their own color.

Gratuitous Violence Gratuitous violence is both the means and the justification for all minifig behavior. Every minifig activity from peace negotiations to gardening to basic dental hygeine has gratuitous violence as its end result.

Olothontor and Kidko find themselves in a zombie-infested museum. Very quick games can be thrown together by scribbling out maps onto sheets of paper. Photo: Kidko from " Zombie Survival ". Delaying a Turn Turns can come up when players or their troops aren't ready to take them. Soldiers may be waiting to coordinate with allies or spring an ambush.

Humans may be taking a long time in the Human bathroom, or may have just been kicked in the Human groin and can't get up off the floor for a few minutes. The current player or other impatient players acting on the current player's behalf can delay their turn for a more opportune time. Their turn is put on hold, and the turn order continues as normal. Once the delayed player is ready to proceed again, they can un-delay and take their turn after whoever is the current player, and this becomes their new position in the turn order.

If a player delays for so long that their turn comes around again naturally, they don't get to take a double turn - they delayed too long and missed their chance. While it's easiest to pick a turn order and stick with it, players can mix the sequence up as they see fit. Some players like to roll dice to randomize the order of each cycle of turns, or to let the current smallest army decide the turn order each round.

General Yadlin briefs Nyphilian cabinet members on the success of PandoraNuker's objectives in Project Orion, despite his having later become the hated war criminal FedoraNuker. Regardless of the "official" mission objectives, reducing a pristine battlefield to complete chaos is a clear victory for everyone. Minifigs are notoriously poor at sharing. There's nothing in the world they won't use as justification for mutual homicide. Any minifigs saddled withsuch a repug nant goal should ignore their Humans' orders and kill themselves immediately in protest.

In-Game Attributes. Wiki: White Nun. The length of a sixteen-stud brick is exactly five inches, a standard measurement distance for movement and ranged attacks. More Ways To Die. An assortment of d6es, d10s, and one glass d0. You will almost certainly never need a d0 in BrikWars. Whether or not a roll of 0 on a d0 earns Bonus Dice is undefined. Elements shown: dice. The D Word Unlike Humans, a minifig's fundamental biologikal processes are based on plastic and die rolls rather than hydrocarbon-based cellular metabolism and memes.

Minifig children learn the basics about their d6 in controversial Six Ed classes, while rumors of more exotic dice are spread in salacious whispers behind closed doors. Religious and moral leaders forbid the use of four-letter obscenities like "dice" and "roll," making them incredibly popular in insults, comments sections, and basic minifig dialogue.

Like all really good curse words, the D word can fill any grammatical role in a sentence, and can stand in for any concept or subject with proper context and emphasis. Euphemisms for "dice" include "bones," "craps," "a pair," and "the D," allowing minifig expletivists to construct advanced phrases like "I don't give two craps how boned we are, if we don't roll in like we've got a pair we're never getting that D.

If players don't have any ten-sided dice, they can replace any d10 roll with 2d - that is, rolling two six-sided dice and subtracting two from the result. Is this statistically equivalent? Not really. Does it matter? See The Law of Fudge later in this chapter. The right answer is the wrong answer if it takes more than thirty seconds to look it up. When checking a rule isn't worth the effort, it's better to axe a stupid question. Inspired by divine fudge, these formerly dreary and law-abiding citizens have turned to a fulfilling life of crime.

The power of fudge overrides all laws. Elements shown: LEGO, fudge. Remember that while you're fudging everything your opponents aren't objecting to, they're trusting you to set the limits on their fudging in return. They won't know what degree of rule-minding you're most comfortable with if you don't tell them.

The Nuclear Option Traditional wargamers sometimes react badly to BrikWars' opposition to its own rules, especially when it gives their opponents a blank check to break the game at will. What I Say Goes Rolls are good for mediating disputes and introducing new material outside the scope of the rulebook, but they also give every player at the table a nuclear option. Regardless of whether you're following the letter of the rules, if the other players don't feel that you're playing in good faith, they'll pull the What I Say Goes trigger.

Back: Book One: Core Rules. Next: Chapter 2: The Mighty Minifig. Chapter 1: Gameplay 1. Elements shown: LEGO, Nanoblock, die Little is known about Humans, but this much is fact: young or old, rich or poor, all Humans harbor secret toy armies and dreams of conquest.

Anyone failing this requirement is either not a real Human or has forgotten how to be one. BrikWars provides a safe and comfortable setting for construction toy armies to mutilate and slaughter one another for the entertainment of their Humans. Unlike less serious wargames, BrikWars is about combat between the toys themselves. Players take turns moving toy troops and toy vehicles through toy terrain to attack one another with toy weapons and die horrifying toy deaths.

The conflicts can be large or small, balanced or skewed, orderly or chaotic, as long as they deliver the mindless violence on which minifigs' psychological health and happiness depend. Setup Olothontor and Kidko find themselves in a zombie-infested museum. Photo: Kidko from " Zombie Survival " Players prepare for BrikWars by assembling armies, fortifications, and scenery as dictated by the imagination and toy collections of the Humans involved.

Plastic brick construction is best, allowing forces and landscaping to be modified on the fly to reflect damage, equipment changes, and dramatic posturing, but armies of stuffed animals and action figures can march through book-stack mountains and shoebox buildings using the same rules. A typical BrikWars battle has two to four players with a dozen units each, fighting over a tabletop-sized battlefield either a literal tabletop, or a tabletop-sized area of the floor , lasting two or three hours or until players decide to stop.

Battles can of course be much larger or smaller, from single-combat duels between lone Heroes in tight arenas, to quick-paced skirmishes between several dozen small teams all seeking to steal the same prize keg of Maniac Beer, to epic multi-faction zombie invasion campaigns run online with thousands of minifigs and taking months to complete. Your First Battle When players are first starting out, they should aim for teams of around five units each - either five regular minifigs, or if they're playing with the Hero rules in Chapter Six, four minifigs and one Hero.

This is a good number to get a feel for how units move and work together, how long a turn lasts, and the overall pacing of how much happens in a single turn. For the battlefield, new players should start small. Place the armies a foot apart with some simple buildings in between to break their line of sight.

This will give minifigs the opportunity to seek out cover and maneuver for advantage without needing to cover a lot of ground to reach direct combat range. Playing a quick tight skirmish to become familiar with the flow of the game will give new players a much better idea of what size and type of battles they'll enjoy before they jump into larger and more complex engagements.

Turns can come up when players or their troops aren't ready to take them. When a player can use an ability "once per turn," the ability resets at the beginning of that player's own turn, ignoring those of other players. When an ability can be used "once on each player's turn," the ability resets at the beginning of every player's turn, whether belonging to the unit's own player or an opponent.

When minifigs battle, it's never over something worth fighting for. Causes like civil liberty, economic justice, or species self-preservation elicit nothing more than reliable yawns compared to disagreements over beverage brands, musical taste, t-shirt colors, or religious faith. Just like in Human conflicts, only the most face-slapping trivialities have the power to rise above petty rationality to inspire mass murder. No battle should ever end with any faction holding the moral high ground.

As in real life, this is considered a loss for all sides. When measuring between elevations, downward motion is always free. Whether firing arrows over a wall, launching a school bus off a ramp, taking sniper shots from a guard tower, or stepping off a diving board into a volcano, minifigs can measure to any point above a target rather than to the target itself.

Unlike Humans, a minifig's fundamental biologikal processes are based on plastic and die rolls rather than hydrocarbon-based cellular metabolism and memes. The d6. The d Critical Failure If all the dice in a roll come up "1," then the roll is a Critical Failure, regardless of other pluses and minuses.

Whatever task a player or unit was attempting fails completely, no matter how easy it might have been. A player may elect not to roll a Bonus Die that he or she earned, for whatever reason. Traditional wargamers sometimes react badly to BrikWars' opposition to its own rules, especially when it gives their opponents a blank check to break the game at will.

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Chapter 1: Gameplay. Unsophisticated players might think that the Letter of the Rules is more important than the Spirit, but the Letter is a lot less likely to sneak up behind you with an axe if you abuse it. Almighty Benny and Major Natalya settle their BrikWars differences over a high-stakes game of Nano-BrikWars, proving themselves to be deadly metagamers. Bricks Bricks are the fundamental physical material making up the worlds of BrikWars. An individual brick is called a component - the smallest physical piece of an object that can't be disassembled any further, like a brick in a wall, the head of a minifig, or the entire body of a horse. Most objects in BrikWars are built from plastic construction bricks, but non-construction toys and other components are included as well; minifigs can't tell the difference. It's good to have a supply of spare bricks close at hand.

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BrikWars is a free miniatures wargaming system by Mike Rayhawk, created for use with plastic building blocks and figurines. It is designed to be simple and flexible, allowing for its players' full range of creativity in creating armies, creatures, vehicles, and worlds out of construction toys. Although targeted primarily at adults, BrikWars is known for its straight-faced acceptance of the kinds of ridiculous scenarios and multi-genre mashups that arise naturally when children dump out their unsorted toybins on the floor. Much of its humor comes from satirizing "serious" wargames and their players, while flouting or deliberately misinterpreting conventions of the genre. BrikWars is the plastic-brick wargaming system that throws the peaceful worlds of your favorite construction toys into wanton chaos and destruction!

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